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What is an AVM
or formally known as an Arteriovenous Malformation ? This was the question on the minds of my family when it happened to me. An AVM is a congenital disorder of the connections between veins and arteries in the vascular system. The genetic transmission patterns of AVM (if any) are unknown, and AVM is not generally thought to be an inherited disorder--unless in the context of a specific hereditary syndrome.

AVMs can occur in various parts of the body including the brain (see cerebral arteriovenous malformation), spleen, lung, kidney, spinal column, and liver. AVMs may occur in isolation or as a part of another disease (e.g. Von Hippel-Lindau disease or hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia).

This bleeding can be devastating, particularly in the brain. It can cause severe and often fatal strokes. If detected before a stroke occurs, usually the arteries feeding blood into the nidus can be closed off, ensuring the safety of the patient.

 JenningsWire.com Radio Interview

Asbury Park Press Newspaper Interview

NJSGA Magazine Summer 2017 Article

Living Media Profile 2009

Testmonial for Speaking

Keith presented at our April 11, 2017 county support group, which consists of brain injury survivors and their caregivers. Our group members come from very different backgrounds, and make up varies kinds of acquired brain injury diagnoses. Keith was referred to us by another support group who enjoyed his visit, so we were more than happy to have him come speak to our group members and share his journey. Our hope was his story, motivation, and/or perseverance throughout his nearly two decade recovery, would resonant with our survivors and their caregivers, give them another individual to connect with and be a new motivator for those who may need it.

 

   Keith’s presentation was impressive, he spoke of not just the positive aspects of his recovery, but he also shared the challenges and road blocks along the way. He was able to convey his story with confidence and added a lot of humor along the way, which added great entertainment and rapport with his audience. Even when he finished his story, Keith took many questions from our group member which started more discussion amongst everyone.

 

   We truly enjoyed having Keith present & visit our support group. He traveled far & was able to accommodate to our group’s schedule, which is so appreciated. We’d love to have him back in the future! Some feedback from several of our survivor group members include:

 

·        “I thought he was truly inspirational.  My neighbor was grieving her partner who died of a brain problem similar to his.  I told the long story of rehab and the cost.  It appeared to soften her pain when she understood what is entailed and truly remote the chance was. His resilience was huge and hope-filled.”

 

·        “We liked him very much, thought he was great. Thank you for inviting him to speak.” 

 

·        “I enjoyed listening to Keith very much primarily because he was very inspiring.

 

·        “I really liked how open & honest he was about himself. Even though it’s been 18 years, how he continues to struggle and make gains all at the same time.”

 Thank you for coming to our group, Keith! It was a pleasure having you and you’re welcome back any time!

 Kessler rehabilitation

Essex County Support Group Facilitators:

Judi Weinberger, M.Ed., LRC, CBIST

Kirsten Colangelo, MSW, LSW

Andrea Trotta Gagliano, MS, CRC, LAC

 

Information Provided from Wikipedia.org